Nataani Nez (That’s me)

Trees in transition at Grand Teton National Park.
Trees in transition at Grand Teton National Park.

The Gypsy Carpenters are in Portal, AZ ahead of schedule. We were planning some more back country explorations but the wonky transmission flared up. Again. Our 2001 Dodge diesel is occasionally difficult to shift. This summer it started balking and we made an appointment at a specialist in Whitefish, Montana. We had a place to park and a car to borrow up there. Then the problem shifting disappeared, the parking place was less welcoming, and the spare car was wrecked by a deer so we cancelled the appointment. We drove a few thousand more miles and no trouble. Heads deeply in the sand. Call us risk-takers.

We high tailed it out of Montana and abandoned plans to fish in Yellowstone because of foul weather. We blasted through the park and made it to a glorious fall scene in Grand Teton National Park. That night we camped near Pinedale, Wyoming. As we approached Vernal, UT I made it clear I wanted to stop at Dinosaur National Monument. Burt was ambivalent. I insisted. We had been before but the quarry exhibit was closed for major repairs (4 years of repairs) and Burt had not seen the most awesome dinosaur display in the world. Well, the LaBrea tarpits come close but they aren’t just dinos. Just then the transmission started to balk. I feared Burt would scuttle the side excursion but he didn’t. Rain was headed our way and it was hard to enjoy the tour wondering why we didn’t get the transmission repaired back in Montana but it was worth the effort. Even Burt was amazed at the in-situ display of 149 million year old fossil bones. Take the trip if you are within 100 miles. That night we limped to a rest area south of Price.

I contacted my friend Berna and said, “Hey we’re coming to see you. Tomorrow.” Berna is always sociable and welcoming. We trained for several marathons and ultra-marathons together and once upon a time worked at EPA together. Berna was ready to see us. We spent two nights in Shiprock. We helped Berna attach reflectors to a road sign so her 80 year old Uncle Alex could find the turn into his road more easily. Maybe I shouldn’t freely confess what could be construed as defacement of public property but I admit it. All three of us were in on it. I suggested that 80 years and difficulty seeing at night might be ground to stop night driving. I was voted down. All of us had dinner at a restaurant called Nataani Nez. Nataani Nez was a Bureau of Indian Affairs boss in the 1930s. Alex told us a story about him and how his name means tall boss.

The next day we drove 400 miles looking for piñon pines. Burt is a natural hunter gatherer and Berna’s Navaho family took many expeditions to the mountains to gather piñons. Berna’s mom had died a few years ago and Berna had not been out since her mother’s death. We decided it was time. Too bad we couldn’t find a tree. We covered the entire NW corner of New Mexico. Finally through the use of Facebook and general perseverance we found a productive tree. One tree. After 4 hours in the car we spent 1 1/2 hours on our hands and knees collecting pine nuts. Between the three of us we collected over $200 worth of nuts. Even the dogs got into it. Olive says she prefers acorns to pine nuts. Burt’s driving annoyed Berna and Berna’s driving terrified us so I was voted in to drive us home. Me, the non-driver, was fast enough but safe enough so no one complained. That’s how I earned the name Nataani Nez. Tall boss.

In the midst of this Burt called out trusty Animas mechanic, Darren. Darren has done some major repairs for us and we can’t complain. He was ready to see us as soon as we could get there. With our crosscountry trip coming up we it was time to stop playing like ostriches and get the transmission fixed. We decided to head straight to Portal and get ready for Portal Irish Music Week. Here we are.

This is mostly the view I see when I visit the Tetons.
This is mostly the view I see when I visit the Tetons.
Special colors on this tree.
Special colors on this tree.
Grand Teton National Park
Grand Teton National Park
Dinosaur National Monument
Dinosaur National Monument
Miss Northern Navaho Nation
Miss Northern Navaho Nation
Sign remodel
Sign remodel
Berna and Alex
Berna and Alex
The nostril of the second fattest horse I've seen. The most fat was at its side.
The nostril of the second fattest horse I’ve seen. The most fat was at its side.
Berna sporting her 1999 Portal Marathon Finisher T-shirt. I had one, too.
Berna sporting her 1999 Portal Marathon Finisher T-shirt. I had one, too.
Piñon pine nut gathering.
Piñon pine nut gathering.
Pine nuts
Pine nuts
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Caterpillar poop (Frass)

Frass or caterpillar poop
Frass or caterpillar poop

There is a caterpillar the size of my thumb dining on the Virginia Creeper here. As part of my duties as one of the editors of the Friends of Cave Creek Canyon Facebook page I thought, “That’s a nice bug. I think I’ll get a picture for our page.” Getting a clear and interesting picture of a small moving object is fraught with trouble. The wind blows, the caterpillar is in sun and shade, there are snakes in the bushes, my low to the ground squat was unstable…I spent quite a bit of time and all my photos were blurry or over exposed. The iPhone and I were at our technical limits. The caterpillar was swinging its head back and forth as if it was a boxer trying to avoid a jab. I thought maybe it was starting to form its chrysalis. I couldn’t see any silk so I wondered about what it was doing. Then it extruded a poop. I was surprised. I presumed caterpillars had dead ends like some larva. Wrong. Caterpillar poop is so important to fertilizing the world that it has a name, frass. This particular caterpillar, a sphinx moth larva, poops star shaped turds with white centers. These are the loveliest feces I have ever seen. A Facebook follower suggested they would make nice earrings. All vegetable.

Sphinx moth caterpillar
Sphinx moth caterpillar. This was the best I could do.
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House Wren

Juvenile House Wren
Juvenile House Wren

A couple of days ago the Gypsy Carpenters made an excursion to the Southwest Research Station to try and spot a green kingfisher. The green kingfisher is rare in these parts and quite a flashy bird so we thought we’d give it a go. We did not find this particular bird. We saw some hummingbirds and a few lizards. Then I spotted this young wren flitting about in an old log structure. The juvenile bird was not fully feathered but it could fly. It was also feeding itself on small insects in the cracks in the logs. Every few minutes mom came along and delivered a bigger snack. I caught the passing of a nice plump spider. These birds typically lay five to nine eggs so it makes me wonder what happened to the other fledglings. If you are wondering if this indeed is a house wren, you are right to be puzzled. I conferred with several experts before we agreed it was in fact a house wren. The Bewick’s (pronounced Buick) wren is common here, too, and has a pronounced white eyebrow. This bird’s eyebrow is pretty dramatic for a house wren but it’s yellow lower mandible was the clincher. Only house wrens have a yellow lower mandible. I did not know. I enjoyed watching this scene. The young one was quiet and busy checking out the cracks most of the time. The mother bird was busily hunting nearby. Suddenly mom would sing, “I have something for you!” and the baby would sit up tall and fluff its feathers and sing back, “Me me me me me me.” Hearing the young one’s song gave mom a map to its location.

Mom bringing in a spider.
Mom bringing in a spider.
Peeking at me.
Peeking at me.
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Mother-in-law Cottage

The gable for the back bedroom.
The gable for the back bedroom.

I’m struggling to keep up these days as a carpenter’s assistant. I’m not strong enough, quick enough, or smart enough. I feel like I might be retiring soon.

After three weeks of convoluted emails and phone calls I was hooked up to a 30 day cardiac event monitor on Saturday. I am to wear this beeper sized device with two electrodes for a month. We hope to see what is making me collapse on the tennis court. It can record irregular rhythms that it detects or that I detect and tell it to record.

The thing recorded an event in the wee hours of Sunday morning and woke me from a very vivid dream. I was in the process of doing the bird-of-paradise yoga pose in front of an audience. This was at the behest of a medical technician trying to make my heart do the funny thing it does. The heart monitor alarm went off just as my arms were bound behind my back and I was shifting my weight to my left foot and preparing to stand up. BEEP BEEP BEEP. But here’s the weird thing. I’m not sure if I was having a cardiac event or only dreaming I was having a cardiac event. It took several rounds of beeping for me to rouse myself from sleep. Eventually I discovered one of the wires had become disconnected. Did this trigger the alarm? Better go download the data.

Burt and I trudged to the house and I called the hotline. It was 1:30 AM. We downloaded the data. There was data so that means there might have been an event. The woman with the slight German accent reminded me if the monitor goes off from a monitor detected event the alarm will sound until I call them and download the data. If I trigger a recording manually no alarm will sound. So much for sleep.

Then Sunday came. I recorded an event manually. As evening drew I saw that the machine indicated two events for the day but I had only intentionally recorded one. I decided to download the data since the machine can only hold three recordings. Long story short, it was malfunctioning. The recorder would not download the data. A new machine is on it’s way. Yesterday I had another massive event (while playing tennis). Alas, it went unrecorded. I should have my new machine today.

All of this to say wearing a heart monitor is enough to make a person meltdown or have a cardiac event. All activities and clothing must take the device into account. My mind is filled with recurring thoughts. Thoughts that do not make for an easy demeanor. Is it working? was that a blip? Am I still attached? Is it going to jam? No wonder I want to retire.

On the positive side I am practicing fiddle and mandolin regularly.

Me doing what I can do.
Me doing what I can do.
Flatish roofs are fun to work on.
Flatish roofs are fun to work on.
Measure and cut.
Measure and cut.
The window and door out the back bedroom.
The window and door out the back bedroom.
Back bedroom and its tiny covered porch.
Back bedroom and its tiny covered porch.
Side view of front room and original construction.
Side view of front room and original construction.
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Flying Solo at the Cave Creek VIC

Cave Creek Visitor Information Center
Cave Creek Visitor Information Center

I completed my first day solo at the Cave Creek Visitor Information center today. We had ten visitors and a rain storm. I successfully answered all questions. One visitor signed the guest book and mentioned that I was a ‘very pleasant hostess’. I surmise the day was a success. In between the 10 visitors I practiced mandolin, read a novel, researched gila monsters and quail, and cleaned the bathrooms.

Can you find Portal on the map? This is the Chiricahua Mountain range.
Can you find Portal on the map? This is the Chiricahua Mountain range.
This is a hand made sculpture of the Chiricahua Mountain range.
This is a hand made sculpture of the Chiricahua Mountain range.
Arial view. The white dot in the upper right corner is the VIC location.
Arial view. The white dot in the upper right corner is the VIC location.
Pretty but non-native butterflies.
Pretty but non-native butterflies.
The main room. The table in the foreground holds the 3-D map of the Chiricahua Mountains.
The main room. The table in the foreground holds the 3-D map of the Chiricahua Mountains.
These two snakes get along but are not related. One is a black rattler from the Rincon Mountains. The other is a black-tailed rattler.
These two snakes get along but are not related. One is a black rattler from the Rincon Mountains. The other is a black-tailed rattler.
The Gila Monster is peeling.
The Gila Monster is peeling.
The Diamond back was lethargic today.
The Diamond back was lethargic today.
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Millipedes

Millipede
Millipede

Hundreds of millipedes were crossing Foothills Road last week and, of course, one wondered, “Why did the millipede cross the road?” I’m still seeking an answer. All I’ve learned is there are things called millipede migrations which seem more like millipede explosions. Our lovely monsoon weather has made for a lot of happy millipedes. They are out on the town looking for each other.  The males have modified feet that serve as their reproductive organs. Convenient.

Millipedes are among the oldest land mammals. Don’t confuse them with the centipede. They are far gentler and usually vegetarians. Millipedes mostly eat decayed vegetable matter. They do clean up. Sometimes they get out of hand in gardens and eat new growth but mostly they are harmless and fun to look at. Gently poke one and it will roll into a spiral and play dead.

Nobody here but us dead millipedes.
Nobody here but us dead millipedes.
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Major Work Today

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) or Princess Leia?
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) or Princess Leia?

Burt was on the job at 6:00. At 7:00 he was feeding me oatmeal (punishment). By 8:00 we were both on the job for a major push. High winds in this canyon make us loathe to partially frame something. Better to get it all done in a day so it has some stability if the winds pick up.

I despaired of my ability to work after a few hours of dragging ten foot 2x4s to the saw and then over to Burt for nailing. It was a hot. I teetered a few times. Those earmuff hearing protectors hold in the heat. I never appreciated the cooling role of our external ear flaps until I started wearing the muffs. After lunch I felt better and finished out the day feeling like I did my job. There were some miscuts and a poorly placed sill plate but Burt had to rip out some framing he misplaced. These things happen.

Tomorrow we’ll apply the sheeting and this part of the remodel will be fully safe from the wind.

8AM slab
8AM slab
Tied to the chop saw.
Tied to the chop saw.
Laying out the front wall.
Laying out the front wall.
Propped up wall
Propped up wall
Chiricahua view
Chiricahua view
More view
More view
Lunchtime. Rafters.
Lunchtime. Rafters.
All rfters done
All rafters done
All framing done.
All framing done.
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Chiricahua Peloncillo Heritage Days of 2015

chiricahua peloncillo heritage days 2015
Chiricahua Peloncillo heritage days 2015 schedule

I’m totally ripping off my friend BAlvarius. He suggested I promote the Chiricahua Peloncillo Heritage Days of 2015 and it was a great idea. I went to his blog and stole this pictures. I have them somewhere in my email but it was easier to steal from him. BAlvarius would not call it stealing. He would say I am making the pie bigger. And I am.

Check out this agenda. If you love this area then this event has something for you. History, geology, nature, archeology. All that and THE GYPSY CARPENTERS providing music. I’m aiming for a historic theme. We’re talking old time fiddle music and cowboy songs. We’ll see how practice goes this month. It will be fun.

The Heritage Days event starts Friday night with a lecture on the Elegant Trogon.  Saturday, September 12th the lecture series continues and on Sunday the 13th there are three field trips to chose from.  Many of the presenters come from our knowledgeable field of locals. Burt and I are planning to split up on Sunday. I hope to see you there.

Geology tour of Cave Creek Canyon
Geology tour of Cave Creek Canyon
Interpretive history trip to Paradise, Arizona
Interpretive history trip to Paradise, Arizona
Wildflower and history walk in Cave Creek Canyon.
Wildflower and history walk in Cave Creek Canyon.
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The Painted Pony Resort Awaits You

A view through the garden to the Chiricahua Mountains at the Painted Pony Resort.
A view through the garden to the Chiricahua Mountains at the Painted Pony Resort.

Looking for a place to host a family reunion? A wedding? Business retreat? The Painted Pony resort in New Mexico’s bootheel is a great place. Click HERE for a looksie. There’s a pool!

Our friend and frequent Gypsy Carpenter Blog commenter BALvarius manages the place. He’s done a great job on range restoration and general upkeep. This year he’s had 8 swarms of bees to contend with. If the bees like it, it must be a great place.

Yesterday we went out and and did some work for BAlvarius. We split a laundry/storage room into a laundry room and a storage room. The room is now divided with a wall and a door. Supplies on one side, laundry on the other. This keeps everything neat and tidy and in its proper place. The laundry room is open for the guests to use and the supplies are out of their way.

BAlvarius also has a blog where he, too, covers a wide range of subjects. He is a far better photographer than me. I suggest you take a peek. His Blogging from the Bootheel link is on the left but here’s a direct link. BAlvarius has been kind to help me with my technical questions over the years and he is a fantastic and perpetual booster for the Chiricahua and Peloncillo area. Thanks for the work BAlvarius. Always a pleasure to see you.

Homemade hammer handle. BAlvarius saw this and insisted I post about it. It is a beauty. Too bad I cracked it by inappropriately prying.
Homemade hammer handle. BAlvarius saw this and insisted I post about it. Hammer handles wear out. Usually by inapproriate prying. Burt made this in Mexico with a tree branch from Arizona. It is a beauty. Too bad I cracked it by inappropriately prying.
Those wedges are used to replace hammer handles. Burt used a nail because the wedges weren't enough.
Those wedges are used to replace hammer handles. Burt used a nail, too, because the wedges weren’t enough.
Supplies safe and sound. It takes a lot of stuff to maintain the place.
Supplies safe and sound. It takes a lot of stuff to maintain the place.
This is a one coat wall texture job.
This is a one coat wall texture job.
From the inside of the supply closet.
From the inside of the supply closet.
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The Water is UP!

Nature Trail under water.
Nature Trail under water.

The monsoon season is fully formed and not holding back. Four years ago a very large and intense forest fire burned the high country. I’ve written here many times about how beautiful the area remains despite the widespread changes brought by the fire. Beautiful it is, but drastically changed, too. The high country no longer has the same ability to buffer and absorb rainfall. Trees and grasses and soil act like a sponge and hold rain water and slow its decent into streams. With less vegetation and soil the water runs off faster and creates localized flooding. The same thing happens in heavily paved areas of cities. Last year the area saw a so-called 500 year flood where local roads and properties suffered damage.

This season we have seen very regular rains and the area’s soils are becoming saturated. Early this morning we had an intense rain event and a storm that in the past might have been unremarkable or merely typical caused the creek to jump its banks and find the new routes carved by last year’s flood. The main road in and out of the area was under water. Coincidentally a meeting was scheduled for today to talk about long range recreational use in the canyon. The district ranger was coming to town to talk to locals about campgrounds and roads after last year’s flood. The public meeting was cancelled and we all switched to public safety mode.

Closing a road that is the primary route for a facility housing a couple hundred people (SW Research Station) and a scattered neighbors plus an eager to recreate public is no minor thing. People become confused and frustrated. They see officials driving the road and wonder why they’re not allowed. It’s a good question. First it’s important to remember public officials are officially examining the area and assessing threats to public safety and infrastructure. They sometimes take risks. Secondly, submerged roads might only have a few inches of water that can easily be navigated but the road itself is at risk if it is used while submerged. Asphalt roads depend on a compact and dryish or dry subsurface for their integrity. The ability of the road to bear a load comes from the subsurface. That’s why when you see interstate highway construction being done most of the time is spent on the sub-asphalt layers. Compaction and drainage work are critical to the longevity of the asphalt surface. A submerged road has mud underneath. Mud is squishy and can’t provide support. Driving on the road causes a wave to form in the asphalt as the tires move the vehicle’s weight. That wave is deeper and more damaging on a saturated substrate. Eventually the asphalt will fail and potholes will form. Worse, there can be subsidence and sink holes. Drivers can get caught in an instantaneous failure of the road. Failure can be great or small. A whole lane can wash away or maybe just a six inch pot hole will form. A six inch deep pothole may not be life threatening but it is certainly a risk to a car.

So the Cave Creek Road is good and squishy today and for a couple more days. The District Ranger has closed the road. It’s for your protection and the long term viability of the road. Please minimize your travel up and down canyon.

The District Ranger was in town.
The District Ranger was in town.
The road was closed.
The road was closed.
New buddy.
New buddy.
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