OFF-Off-off-Broadway

An arriving student seeking a welcoming kiss. Pretty much made every trip to town worth it.
An arriving student seeking a welcoming kiss. Pretty much made every trip to town worth it.

The Bridge to English 2014 Inaugural Concert has come and gone. After two months of weekly singing classes a performance for the ages was presented to friends and family of our music students. The Gypsy Carpenters learned a lot when they participated in the 3 hour holiday extravaganza of kindergarteners back in December. What they learned is 25 minutes is all you need to blow your audience away. If it’s a flop, it’s over quick and if it’s a success, there is nothing wrong with leaving the crowd hungry. We had snacks for the past show party.

Last week’s post-traumatic stress brought on by tough guy teens that failed to sing a single syllable of any songs brought divine inspiration. As directress of this revue I was wondering how best to present the material. I wanted to do a group vocal exercise with all our students and staff and family and friends but then what. Being a ploddingly predictable engineer at times, I was stuck on the idea of putting the kidlets up first and building in age until we had the oldest and most jaded amongst us taking the stage last. If the teens failed to produce we’d just fizzle out and have to skulk home. My other idea was to end it all with a grand Hokey Pokey. Hundreds in concentric circles wagging and shaking and twisting and turning on my command, but how to inspire a grand Hokey Pokey after the silent lip syncing of surly teens? There was my answer! I’d put the teens on first and get them out of their misery and not allow them to stew or conspire while the tweens and niƱos slayed their parents.

I told Serena my idea and she agreed it was brilliant and she added, merciful. The teens could get up and out and like a terrific vaccination it would be over before they knew what had happened. And that is exactly what happened. Serena introduced us and the Bridge to English program and then we called up the teenagers to do their bit. They never saw it coming. While Serena finished with the business of things I gave them a pep talk. You can see by the crossed arms and grim demeanors that most of them didn’t believe a word I said. Too bad for them. I was right. They were all stars. By going first the audience was warm and kind and gave them big cheers for their whispered renditions of Three Little Birds, There’s a Bad Moon Arising, and Stand By Me. They were wonderful. Wigged out by the twin goloms of peer pressure and an audience they stood up and did their best. It’s hard to breath and make much noise if you don’t want to be seen in public making a mistake. Kudos for the kids that stepped up and tried. A special shout out to Burt that gave them not a beat to rest between songs. He made it move so fast they never had to take their eyes of the lyric sheets and see who was watching.

The tweens and younger set killed us with their smiles and spot on rhythm. On Top of Spaghetti elicited some delirious moans of recognition from gringo parents. Nick Nack Paddy Whack left me gasping for breath. I’ll need to up my aerobic training for next year. Our teapots all poured hot water onto each other since I had never bothered to try and get everyone pouring in the same direction. Choreographer I am not. I could hardly keep my own handle and spout organized. And then it was time. Time for the show stopping Hokey Pokey. I called for body parts. I got eyes, shoulders, feet, legs, hair, fingers….and…cadera. Um…Cadera? We’re practicing English. English, please, and there it was, in a surreptitious, almost naughty tone from the depths of the legion of children surrounding me, Our Holy Grail of the Hokey Pokey…bottom. BOTTOM did you say? Bottom.

And so it was. I did all the parts and repeated (I know not why. Perhaps, menopause?) thee times feet. I kept searching for the missing part (leg) and said feet over and over. Ah well. Repetition is how you learn. The whole show took 25 minutes. Perfect. Snacks awaited.

How lucky are we two to have been part of this? Another facet of our musical life building community wherever we are. Thanks to Burt, Bequia, Tom, Magi and Cathie and all the Bridge to English teachers for helping me out. We couldn’t have done it without you.

The youngest kids gathering and waiting for their turn to shine.
The youngest kids gathering and waiting for their turn to shine.
I'm telling the teens that they are 'ESTRELLAS' stars. They chose not to believe me but they were anyway.
I’m telling the teens that they are ‘ESTRELLAS’ stars. They chose not to believe me but they were anyway.
Bang that tambourine (pandero).
Bang that tambourine (pandero).
Serena, Burt and I play coach, conductor, backup...whatever it takes to get the show going.
Serena, Burt and I play coach, conductor, backup…whatever it takes to get the show going.
Do the Hokey Pokey.
Do the Hokey Pokey.
On Top of Spaghetti
On Top of Spaghetti
World famous bottom shakers of Todos Santos.
World famous bottom shakers of Todos Santos.

 

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8 thoughts on “OFF-Off-off-Broadway”

  1. Sounds like an enjoyable ,rewarding , and exhausting time!!! I too have trouble keeping my handle and spout in line :)

  2. I told Willis about the ‘hot water spouts’ aimed helter skelter. He started singing a childhood song we both knew, last line is “and I forgot my spoon” NOT for Bridge to English; these are words the kids do NOT need to learn LOL

  3. You’ll have to teach me. I need some dirty ditties. I only know ‘There’s a skeeter on my peter…whack it off….’

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