More on San Pedro Mártir

Burt in aspen with pine cone epaulets.
Burt in aspen with pine cone epaulets.

El Parque Nacional Sierra de San Pedro Mártir is named for the guy gate keeping in heaven. For a long time (until just this minute) I thought it was some guy with a last name Mártir. Wrong. That’s just a tag on Saint Peter (rock of the church) reminding us he was martyred. Another big oops there. I might have known once but had forgotten he was killed for his beliefs. And this lack of knowledge strikes me as very, very odd. I was just in this guy’s basilica inside the Vatican. My research today, quick and dirty, revealed the church believes St. Peter was crucified head down on the every spot of the basilica’s altar. But details are sketchy and it sounds like early church politics played a role in Peter’s unseemly demise. I guess the church, like so many other things, chooses not to tell the stories that cast it in a bad light. Things like the stories that demonstrate these guys couldn’t agree even in the time of Christ on what Christ was teaching. Nothing has changed. We do know that early Dominican padres founded a mission at the south end of the mountain range and the mountain range and park take their names from that mission.

The park was formed in 1947. It’s home to Picacho del Diablo (the devil is always around) the highest peak in Baja at 10,157′. Numerous large avian species take advantage of the remote and rugged terrain. Both bald and golden eagles are known to frequent the area but most important are the California Condors. The condor reintroduction program has increased the total number of these mighty birds from 22 in 1982 to nearly 500 worldwide today. About half the birds remain in captivity for breeding purposes. Wild populations are not yet stable. This spot in Mexico has had less habitat loss and environmental degradation than US release locations.  Consumption of both micro trash and lead ammunition are the greatest threat to individual survival. The birds in Mexico have successfully reproduced on their own.

Burt and I have seen these birds at three of their release sites and this was our second time spotting one in the Parque Nacional. Eight years ago we saw two. One flew over head on the ridge that divides the Baja peninsula, one side waters head to the Pacific Ocean and on the other they reach the Bay of California. The second bird was in the road trying to eat a red yogurt cap. I got out of the car and retrieved the cap. Think of that bird and those whales and fishes and sea life and pick up that micro-trash you see. It all flows downhill.

 

Desert bighorn sheep?
Desert bighorn sheep?
Map of Parque Nacional de San Pedro Mártir.
Map of Parque Nacional de San Pedro Mártir.
Chava walked out but Olive said, "No way."
Chava walked out but Olive said, “No way.”
Panorama of Bahia de California
Panorama of Bahia de California
Signs to El Mirador.
Signs to El Mirador. Astronomy telescopes on the ridgeline.
Rubber boa
Rubber boa
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One thought on “More on San Pedro Mártir”

  1. We picked up a bag of trash on every walk on the beach at Pt. Pleasant, NJ, with a special eye out for the little pieces of plastic, and balloons with strings, and bottle caps, and plastic wrist braces, and used condoms (yuck, but at least they were used), as well the usual cups, cans, straws and ziplock bags.

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