Burr Removal

This was weeks ago
This was weeks ago. Imagine scores of burrs. So many her ears couldn’t flop and her eyes were closed.

It’s fall in Montana. Leaves are turning. Trout are hungry. Stickers and burrs abound. Olive is caught in a Catch-22 of freeze or collect stickers. To take her outside with us with long hair is to invite a coat full of needles. To shave her is to guarantee hypothermia. Since we have no plans to head south soon we are debating a shave and a new coat or do we spend more hours cleaning her fur. Burr removal is a thankless chore. Olive hates it and resents every minute of our work. Yesterday we went fishing at the confluence of the Dearborn and Missouri rivers. There was an abundance of those football shaped burrs and some hound’s tongue for variety. After 2 hours of fishing we spent 40 minutes of de-burring. The fun to work ratio is pretty low. Anybody have advice? Should we shave? Should we keep up the removal? Mall walk? Leave Olive home?

Below is a raspberry tort I made for a dinner we had with Sue and Jay. Pea soup, salad and tort. The tort was from a recipe for Italian plum cake. The NY Times says it’s the most requested recipe in the history of the newspaper. I find that hard to believe since prior to this summer I have only known my grandmother to regularly make plum cake. I made one once a decade or so ago but I found the recipe on-line. I loved my grandmother’s plum cake but it was a rare seasonal treat. We probably got one piece a year. Burt’s daughter made one last week and like learning a new word the recipe was everywhere I looked. Facebook and the NY Times were filled with it. The benefit of the flood of commentary and news articles is I found the suggested variations. This cake is ready for anything you can throw at it. Since we had a bunch of Sue and Jay’s raspberries in our freezer we went that route. Soon I’m going to try the canned Portal pears. It’s simple and tasty. Give it a go. I used a casserole dish. The gNash is too small for a springform pan.

Also below is a helpful Public Service Announcement. Clean out the grooves on your log splitter before they fill with a rock hard debris. This log splitter had filled to the point that the splitter could no longer split. It took heavy application of hammer and chisel to remove the pressure hardened splinters from the groove. Team Gypsy Carpenter and Sue got the job done but we all agreed preventative cleaning would have been easier.

Raspberry tort
Raspberry tort
Plum tort recipe
Plum tort recipe. I used 3/4 cup sugar.
Cleaning the log splitter
Cleaning the log splitter
Sue can do amazing things with her broom.
Sue can do amazing things with her broom.
Door repair
Door repair
I love hollyhocks.
I love hollyhocks.
A lusty trout from the Dearborn River.
A lusty trout from the Dearborn River.
Burrs we removed from Olive.
Burrs we removed from Olive.
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7 thoughts on “Burr Removal”

  1. Plum cake/tort looks pretty darn fabulous! Cowboy Magic works well on burrs. Softens them up and makes the hair slippery. You can leave it on for a bit and then attack the problem later. Works on humans when their heads get attacked by burdock. Ask me how I know….

    Murdoch’s has some. Or something similar.

  2. Time travel is the solution! Olive looks great weeks ago!

    I make a pear tart that gets lots of kudos. I will try your recipe with whatever fruit I have here.

  3. Thank you for the helpful suggestion, Becky. Really hope I don’t personally have to use it. Sorry you had the unpleasant experience.

  4. Actually, it was really funny. I didn’t grow up around burdock and didn’t know about its Velcro capabilities, that’s my excuse, anyway… Olive had way more then I did!

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