Up in the Wild

Old Ranch near Babisal
Old Ranch near Babisal

Babisal Ranch is at the heart of the Norther Jaguar Project’s reserve. The cows are long gone but the original structure is used as a kitchen and two new adobe and stone guest rooms have been added. Burt and I will turn an old water tank into a third guest room. Year round these facilities are used by cowboys and biologists and other visitors. Overflow people stay in tents or hammocks. On this trip Burt and I scored a cabin of our own. The beds are traditional rancho cots made from burlap suspended between two Xs. With a Thermarest pad the bed is pretty comfortable but it moves a lot and the motion made me a little queasy. More Galapagos training I told myself.

Our group consisted of two donors, Mark and Monica, a photographer, Charles, us, and Randy and Turtle, NJP’s staff/guides. After the 12 hours of driving Burt and I headed straight to bed after dinner and didn’t really get a good look at our companions. We were grateful for the warm food and welcome gifts of NJP hats and personal napkins. In the morning we had some more filling and tasty vegan food and then piled in a pickup for a nearby hike.

All seven humans and three dogs rode up the steep mile or so to another defunct ranch. We would hike up the a tight, wet canyon and pass some camera traps and see what some people consider the spiritual heart of the reserve. In fifteen bumpy minutes we reached our starting point. The abandoned ranch buildings were full of wood perfect for our project. It will be fun to deconstruct and reconstruct out in the wilderness. The old wood will look beautiful in a new situation.

Pretty quickly we reached a camera trap. Randy and Turtle removed the data chip and tried to find a camera that could reveal its secrets. There are a few different models of cameras in use at the reserve and they all have their own way of formatting chips. Luckily our third and last try at reading the chip was successful. The chips and batteries are changed out every one to three months. Since this particular trap’s chip had been changed four mountain lions, a few bobcats, and an ocelot had passed by the trap. The ocelot passed just the day before we did. Smiles all around thinking the ocelot was nearby watching us. As Randy says, I haven’t seen a jaguar but I know they’ve seen me. I like that feeling.

Our walk to the canyon wasn’t more than half an hour. We could have gone further but we didn’t feel like swimming and mud crawling so we sat around and enjoyed the scene. I visited the spiders. Snacks and water and getting to know you conversations were had by all. After people were satisfied with the hanging around we had a choice, return home by the trail we had taken in or canyoneer our way down canyon. We chose the adventure route. It was pretty rough going but Randy was a competent guide and very able assistant. Burt and I did fine on our own. We mostly traveled ahead of the group. It took us much longer to reach the truck going down the boulder filled stream bed but it was also more fun. The dogs have a different version. One ran home on the trail. Another was lifted through the worst spot. The third either jumped or fell twenty feet into a pool. She was not happy. Eventually it was just a stream bed and we all dispersed. Burt and Randy went to inventory wood and I wandered downstream alone.

At the truck point we all reunited. Burt and I opted to avoid the truck bed for the downhill jostle and walked back to camp along the stream. It was a tussocky and watery route back. It was noticeable that there were not a lot of birds. When we finally reached camp it was time for lunch and a siesta.

That evening we took a silent sunset walk. We heard an elf owl. Or was it pygmy? I’ve forgotten. Tracks were seen in the creek bed sand. Quail flew up. We thought they were scaled quail but they were Elegant Quail. Similar but not the same. Dinner and bed.

The trap camera showed us an ocelot had passed by the day before.
The trap camera showed us an ocelot had passed by the day before.
Boulder crawl down the canyon.
Boulder crawl down the canyon.
Our room.
Our room.
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Getting There

Farmer is a bonny companion.
Farmer is a bonny companion.

Sunday last Burt and I slipped away from Portal at 5 AM. Mimi. Elvis, and Olive were all at their respective captor’s homes. We’d stayed in Portal to play music for friends getting married. Without the wedding we would have headed to Mexico on Saturday and attended the 10th anniversary of the Northern Jaguar Project reserve celebration in Sahuaripa. Instead we made a mad dash to the border and where we entered the weird Sunday morning amateur hour of la frontera. All the border staff were in their twenties and female and serious about their jobs.

First problem was Burt ad stuffed a tissue over the VIN number on the dash and the the guard couldn’t verify our vehicle registration against the VIN. Except the VIN is also on the door. The youngster didn’t want to look at the door she wanted the tissue covered number plate. I admit it looked kind of odd. I tried to dig out the tissue with a rusty scalpel I’ve been keeping on the dash for just such an occasion. The sun decayed tissue did not budge but produced a lot of dust. While I wheezed and dug, Burt kept trying to get the guard to look at the door. She refused. I decided it was because his grammar was slightly off. She could pretend not to understand him and watch me dig. Exasperated, I politely rephrased Burt’s statement and she suddenly looked at the door, took down the number, and let us pass.

Next we got our 6 month visitor’s visa. This time I had to rouse people from hidden chambers. Nobody crosses at 6 AM on Sunday. Tired eyed youngsters materialized at the windows. Our visa forms filled out we took them across the way to pay the fee. This second window was where we needed to get our TIP, too. Mainland Mexico requires a Temporary Import Permit for all vehicles. Baja does not have this requirement so the step was new for me.  Sadly, I accidentally threw away our original 2017 registration in a fit of organizing a month ago. Luckily, Burt discovered it missing so we had a copy the Jefferson County tax assessor had emailed last week.  More sadly, the Mexican government’s representative would not accept a copy. I showed her last year’s original. I explained sweetly and repeatedly that I lost the original and the US government gave me the copy. I wondered if an older more hardened representative would have let me pay the TIP. I wondered if speaking Spanish was working against me. I wondered what to do. Burt and I decided if they didn’t want our money we didn’t need a TIP. We shrugged our shoulders and hoped one arm of big brother didn’t talk to the other arm of big brother and we headed on our way in violation of the law. Most luckily, nobody ever stopped us and there were no checkpoints between the border and our destination.

At noon we arrived in Sahuaripa. We ran into Randy, the ranch manager, leaving for lunch. We ate, did some errands, shifted gear from our truck to his and finally, around 2 PM, started the trip into the mountains. It was 100 degrees. Cholo rode up front with the menfolk. I held my own with Farmer in the backseat. Six hours of single track gravel road later we arrived well after dark at the camp called Babisal. Rancho Babisal is the heart of the reserve. Fresh vegan food and our companions greeted us. We ate and went to bed.

Cholo de la Cholla, also a fine companion.
Cholo de la Cholla, also a fine companion.
Burt and Randy stretch their legs.
Burt and Randy stretch their legs.
Our Lady is blessing us all they way. Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Our Lady is blessing us all they way. Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
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Other Critters at the Reserve

Red-Spotted Toad, Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Red-Spotted Toad, Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Tree frog, Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Tree frog, Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Velvet Ant, Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Velvet Ant, Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Ring necked snake, Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Ring necked snake, Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Tiny cat prints, Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Tiny cat prints, Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Grasshoppers getting down, Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Grasshoppers getting down, Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Frogs, Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Frogs, Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Northern Jaguar Project Reserve, beetle and bugs
Northern Jaguar Project Reserve, beetle and bugs
Tarantula, Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Tarantula, Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Neotropical otter or nutria,Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Neotropical otter or nutria, Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Wolf spider, Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Wolf spider, Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
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Northern Jaguar Project Reserve

Jaguar at the Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
Jaguar at the Northern Jaguar Project Reserve

I was very surprised to see a jaguar on our trip to Mexico but the proof is indisputable. There it is.

That’s the last fake news for this post. Jaguars live among us in southern Arizona and New Mexico. They are few but they are genetically important. The males in the US have come from just south of the border. They disperse and roam away from the wild lands of Mexico and remain available to spread their DNA when the time arrives. Lucky for them a federal judge just deemed these few individuals worthy of consideration when we (our society) makes land use decisions.

I personally consider these US individuals important whether they get a chance to reproduce or not. Here we have an apex predator the likes of which we hardly compare on a human scale. The claws, the jaws, the speed. My cat Mimi times fifty. Taller than me and so much stronger. So seldom are jaguars seen that we need tight networks of cameras surreptitiously taking photos just to prove their existence.  A several hundred pound cat is walking around near major population areas and we can’t see it. Think about it. Habit, camouflage, and rugged terrain make it invisible. In this era of over-exposed everything this mystery gives me joy.

The jaguar species requires vast tracts of land to survive. Aside from room to wander, Jaguars obviously need game to eat and water for fun and nourishment. The land needs to be healthy and full of other animals. Jaguars like to swim.  Protecting the jaguar protects everything in the web of life it shares. The Northern Jaguar Project has been working to provide jaguars sufficient habitat for their survival. They have a 40 something square mile reserve of land in Mexico they own that is managed for the jaguar. The NJP buys land but also works directly with surrounding land owners to provide critical breeding habitat for the northernmost population in the Americas. Nearby cattle ranchers are educated on the jaguar needs and habits and given trail cameras to document individual animals on their land. Through an incentive program that includes damage loss reimbursement, rewards for photos, rent for access to trail cameras, and other things the NJP are expanding their influence and the area of acreage available to the jaguars. In the last ten years fifty individual jaguars have been captured on the NJP’s cameras. One camera even caught a pair copulating. Scores of mountain lions, ocelots, and bobcats have also been seen on the project’s network or cameras.

All this land and cameras requires a team of people to manage. Land costs money but so do staff. There is a ranch manager (Randy, bilingual/bicultural Jack-of-all-Trades) and Turtle (US money wrangler) and a team of cowboys and biologists. There are roads to maintain, fences to mend, and cameras to check. In the backcountry there are simple accommodations that staff and donors use when visiting the area.

For several years Burt has been trying to coordinate a trip in to the reserve to provide some needed carpentry. The main camp cabins are 41 miles and a 6 hour drive from town.  Seven miles an hour and the drive is bone rattling. This year our schedules all had room for a scoping trip. Turtle, Randy, and some donors were headed in and we were available to join them. Working in the wilderness requires a lot of from a team of people. You have to trust each other and you have to be really good with logistics. We all decided to meet and give the job a looksee and decide if we were willing to commit more time. Could we get along with them and could they get along with us?

After our 5 day scoping trip it all looks good from here. More to come. Enjoy these landscape photos of the protected habitat.

The general vicinity of the reserve.
The general vicinity of the reserve.
The Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
The Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
The Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
The Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
The Northern Jaguar Project Reserve - Aros River
The Northern Jaguar Project Reserve – Aros River
The Northern Jaguar Project Reserve
The Northern Jaguar Project Reserve

 

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Sunburst Diving Beetle

Sunburst diving beetle
Sunburst diving beetle

This here bug, I am recently informed, is a rarity in the Chircahua Mountains where I found her. She’s called the sunburst diving beetle. These predators like to eat mosquito larvae. Most astounding is they are the only known organism in the entire animal kingdom with two lenses in each eye allowing for precise near and far vision. It makes them excellent hunters. Wish I had me some of that. Thanks for naming it for me Shane Burchfield. Shane tells me it is also his favorite bug in the world. Shane owns a company called Bugs of America so that’s saying something.

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Tripping off to Mexico Mañana

Me on Bob's fiddle
Me on Bob’s fiddle. Mom always said to clean behind your ears. I see why now.

Today is Laura and Barry’s wedding day. We’ve been hanging around Portal waiting for this day since the bridge was finished. An event well worth waiting for but, my, there’s not much going on when we’re not working or super hiking. I practiced some of my new Irish tunes this week. I read a book. Burt and I visited centenarian Bob again. A bear attacked the gNash. I saw a couple more tarantulas. We took a hike. A mouse landed on my shoulder.

Yesterday Mimi was dropped off at Dodie’s for her extended kitty B&B stay. I left Dodie with Mimi’s bed, food, snacks, bowls, litter box, litter, blankie, and more food. Mimi’s luggage weighs more than mine. We also left Dodie with our minds at ease because we know she won’t mind having an elderly stink ball as a companion. Mimi isn’t so sure what to do with all the floor space. When I left she was completing her 53rd circumnavigation of the living area. The gNash is soulless without our feline companion.

Two nights ago was the incident of the bear under the gNash. Just after 11:00 I was woken by two quick Olive barks. Olive has a sophisticated system of barks. These two barks were ‘I hear something’ and ‘GoAwayBear!’ I woke up and, with Ollie ears in tune new we were under assault. Olive was quiet and there was a dragging/grating sound emanating from just outside the window on Burt’s side of the bed. I leaned over and peered out blindly but thought I saw a very large and dark hump moving. I said, “There’s a bear” as I shook Burt. Like all husbands roused from sleep he yelled, “There is NO bear.” Insert murderer, robber, thief, rapist for bear and you have all men waking up to wife saying: There’s a …. Is this in their DNA or are they taught by their fathers or is it learned after millions of false alarms?

Clearly Burt hadn’t fully assessed the situation. Nor was he awake. Still I thought, maybe he’s right. It’s probably a mouse. Suddenly more dragging noises and I hit Burt again and I said, “There’s a bear.” This time he bolted straight up and yelled, “There’s A bear.” This was the first time in history that I feel Burt actually met or exceeded my level of concern for our physical safety. Wide awake he knew instantly what I did not. Burt knew the bear had found a stash of food under our trailer (Hellooo, Hell, no…) and now the bear knew our trailer was a flimsy tin can of filled with delightful food. Burt closed his window and the window over the dinette. I left mine open. Menopause, bear or no bear. Our noise making scared the bear enough so that noises stopped and we couldn’t see it. Not much sleep was had as we both envisioned the bear ripping off our grey water tank or stretching a paw in to find the dog food. The next morning the bear was still on the pile of dry beans (my zombie apocalypse supply) when Burt went out to check the damages. He chased bruno away. Our storage cooler had sustained minor bite damages and the rice and beans were spread all around. I presume that bear got a mean tummy ache from eating dry beans. Burt cleaned up the mess as best he could. We seal up the windows whenever we leave now but if a bear wants into a trailer it can make it happen. Today we are moving to a new location. Hopefully the bear doesn’t follow.

Also this week we played music for Bob. It was a kind of practice session. Whiel visiting Burt asked Bob if he had any of his instruments still. Bob still had his fiddle which he had inherited from his father. He showed it to us. I got it in tune and played some tunes on it that Bob’s dad might have played. Bob practically seized the thing from me and gave it a go himself. Despite his torn rotator cuff, deafness, long finger nails, and lack of practice the phrase of a tune came out. Bob commented that he liked my bow. You can see the video on Facebook. This private session was further rewarded when Bob left his house and came to our concert the next day. He doesn’t get around like he used to. He and his gal friend Gloria were all the audience we needed to make our day special. We made plans to have another jam session between our Mexico and Galapagos trips.

Another recent wildlife encounter happened when I decided to clean out a bird nesting box on the old adobe stage building where we are parked. I lifted the front of the box and it was packed full of bedding. Fearing biting bugs and the mites I’ve found in other nests I grabbed a stick to clean the place out. As I dug in a very alarmed mouse jumped out and landed on my shoulder. I screamed. She screamed. Then she ran down my chest, jumped to my knee, and then the ground. I stopped cleaning for fear of finding babies. The birds will have to battle it out come spring.

Bob on Bob's fiddle. Originally his father's fiddle.
Bob on Bob’s fiddle. Originally his father’s fiddle.
Barfoot view
Barfoot view
View of Barfoot lookout.
View of Barfoot lookout.
Bear destroys but does not eat dried beans.
Bear destroys but does not eat dried beans.
We had almost an inch of rain in under an hour. Bear tracks in the mud.
We had almost an inch of rain in under an hour. Bear tracks in the mud.
Bob and Gloria made it to our show among many notable Portal residents.
Bob and Gloria (front, far left) made it to our show among many notable Portal residents.
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Hitting the Road

Burt and I are headed south of here.
Burt and I are headed south of here.

We will soon be out of touch for lengthy stretches of time. Starting Sunday we will be in Mexico for about a week. This jaunt is a scoping trip for some work we might do on the Northern Jaguar Project’s preserve outside of Sahuaripa, Mexico. It’s a very remote place. No phones, no help, nobody for about 20 miles and 6 hours of driving. Yes, 6ish hours to cover 20ish miles. I’ll be able to be more specific after our first time up the wilderness. The trip’s goal is to see if we can build some things for them. Challenges abound. We’ll try and answer logistical questions about food, lumber, hardware, roofing, power. No actual work is planned for this first trip. Olive, Elvis, Mimi, and the gNash will all be left behind.

After the scoping trip we return to Portal and then a few days later we catch a flight to Ecuador. Our first trip to the Galapagos! I have no idea what internet will be like in Ecuador. I expect none in the Galapagos. That’s another two weeks without reporting. I’ll be prepared to fill you in when I get back. Like our European trip, I plan to take handwritten notes. Again the rest of the family and our camper will be left behind.

Presuming all went well on the scoping trip we will then head back to the jaguar preserve in Mexico and work for a few weeks. It’s possible the pets and camper will come to Mexico with us for the second trip. Those decisions depend on what we discover during the first trip.

I’ll check in when I can. Wish us luck.

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Some creatures I met this week

A pretty beetle.
A pretty beetle.

The bears are all around this year. Some say there’s not enough food. Others say they’ve had a very profligate couple of years and there are just a lot of them looking for food. Going into Portal is like hitting Costco. Food samples everywhere. Generous stores of bird food abound. There’s even a bunch of fruit trees. Word is five bears have been removed from town this year. Males get exterminated. Females get a second chance. It’s sad.

Many of this year’s Portal Irish Music Week staff and students reported sightings as they walked and drove from classroom to hike to session. SOme were shaken and others thrilled. I was jealous. Burt and I didn’t see any. We heard one in a neighbor’s yard and I found a large print in the sand between our gNash and the lodge. Then just a night or two ago we were walking home in the dark from a friend’s and there was mister bear. I suddenly had sympathy for our timid clients. In the dark, on foot, in brushy country was not the time to wake up a bear sleeping in the creek. I admit I was more than a bit excited and not in the all good way. Mr. Sleepyhead woke himself up and took in our proximity and headed away from us. He was a big boy and I appreciate he decided to give up his bed and let us by without a toll.

A shy black widow.
A shy black widow.
We met this prowling black bear after dark.
We met this prowling black bear after dark.

Green Lynx Spider

Rattlesnake in a cage.
Rattlesnake in a cage.
Lil' bit the sweet duckling.
Lil’ bit the sweet duckling.
A tarantula harassed by ants. I took him to safety.
A tarantula harassed by ants. I took him to safety.
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Finished the course

We only have one moon over our one planet.
We only have one moon over our one planet.

I just wrapped up my course on climate change and communication from Cornell. In summary here’s what I learned: To be effective we need to stop the blame game and focus on local adaptation and mitigation. So, no name calling, no trying to convince people of the facts, no eye rolling, no despair. It’s real, it’s happening, here is what we have to do build hope and lead by example…Insert what you as an individual and a local community can do. You know your towns better than I do. NY State has a great model for local governments to follow. It details a ten step process for local governments to lead. Local governments have a tremendous amount of sway because they consume energy, manage solid waste, have authority over zoning, land use planning, and they involve local citizens. Lead from the bottom up.

Adaptations include changes to agriculture, beefing up infrastructure, addressing new disease vectors, etc. Mitigation include reducing fossil fuel consumption, enhancing carbon sinks. There is no technological solution for binding CO2, yet. We will have to adapt and mitigate to survive but we can do it.

Meanwhile I need to come up with my ‘project’. Shall it be teaching basic birding in Mexico with a side of climate change or blogging more regularly or both. Or any ideas you all may have?

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Species are moving new places

Tarantula
Tarantula

Fall is in the air. Birds are flocking up for the flight south. I’ve heard reports and seen some photos of a vast congregation of Swainson’s hawks near Whitewater Draw in Arizona. Here the Juncos and towhees are gathering. Tarantulas are on the prowl looking for lovely lady friends. This week we have seen three of these large fuzzy arachnids near the house. The males wander around looking for a receptive female this time of year. The sun’s angle is lower in the sky, the air is cool, and spiders are on the loose. Fall….

Recently I’ve been pondering the mass loss of species in our life time. It is very troubling and sad but there are some funny aspects. Most of the great extinction we are currently in is from habitat loss and climate change. The two causes are linked. Some habitat is destroyed by human development and some habitat has succumbed to sea rise and desertification. Meanwhile climate change is rerouting migratory paths as birds follow food sources and weather.

Not all change is bad for everybody. Insects are likely to do very well in a warmer, wetter world. Say hello to roaches, ticks, and fleas Montana. Parasites I thought I left behind 30 years ago in Georgia are making their way across the Mississippi and up the Rockies. Abandoned snakes are thriving in Florida. Anacondas and pythons can claim more territory as land masses sink, sea levels rise, and marshes move inland. I was reading up on pythons and anacondas recently. After I saw the yoga mat posing as an anaconda in the marsh I wanted to make sure I wasn’t crazy for leaping to that conclusion. I’m not. Anacondas are here in the US. Yes, twenty foot long, 500 pound anacondas are here. Like alligators they may soon be moving up north. Here’s the disturbing thing I found in my research. Pythons were thought to be a menace in Florida but, unexpectedly, they have reached a sort of stasis. The python numbers seem to have plateaued because they have a natural control. Pythons are being eaten by another invader species. Fire ants are eating pythons while they nest. Mother pythons lay eggs and sit on the eggs until they hatch. Floating squadrons of fire ants find these nests and eat mom and eggs. Anacondas don’t nest. Anacondas have live births. Let that sink in. Anacondas are now presumed to be the menace that pythons were predicted to be. I’d have preferred to take my chances with the python rather than an alligator eating snake. Pythons crunch your bones and don’t always kill you before they stuff you down the gullet face first. So the snake invaders, a problem caused buy irresponsible pet owners, have met the expanding habitat brought by warmer and wetter conditions in the south.  Keep an eye out Fifi.

I realize I’m going a little overboard here. The point is I am trying to get you paying attention. Fleas, starlings, knapweed, chagas disease, malaria…it’s all on the move. A species finds a nitch and grows to fill it. Everything is in flux. Warmer is not better.

Here’s a funny anecdote about human caused species migration. The case of Escobar’s hippos cannot be blamed on climate change but climate change may play a role in what happens next. Pablo Escobar (narcotraficante of Cloumbia and the 80s) had a zoo on his estate. Escobar was killed in a shoot out at the estate in 1993. Like many eccentric and too wealthy people he had a personal zoo. This zoo featured many animals from all over the world. After their owner died, most of the animals were farmed out to nearby zoos. Some animals were euthanized. Not everybody met such fates. Pablo also had four hippos. Hippopotami weigh two tons each. This pod of a male and three females were left to their own devices on a pond behind a fence. Nobody wanted to move 16,000 pounds of hippo. These four hippos bred and lounged and eventually broke free. Now there are reports of up to 200 hippos in the countryside around the estate. Hippos in Columbia are reproducing at a younger age and a quicker rate than in their home country. Hippos are poised to take over Columbia. Meanwhile they are heading towards extinction in there homeland. No natural predators, more food, and a nice warm home.

All of this to help you imagine the niches our viral, bacterial, and invertebrate friends are finding in the new world we are creating. Hope they find a way to vaccinate for malaria soon, folks. Me? I like spiders.

Same tarantula.
Same tarantula.
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